The AfroFuturist Affair is a community formed to celebrate, strengthen, and promote Afrofuturistic and Black Scifi culture through creative events and creative writing.
The Afrofuturist Affair has a correlative mission of using the proceeds from our events to fund a $500 community grant. The grant, known as The Futurist Fund will be dedicated to serving the needs of members of an under-served community annually.


The AfroFuturist Affair tumblr provides friends, supporters, historians, and aliens with archives on the first event, updates on Afro-future events, present goings-ons, and to exchange language, images, memories, notes, and energies with other Futurists across cyberspace/time. We practice and revere Ancient Wisdom, Mythology, Liberation, History, Future, Metaphysics, Sacred Math, Prophecy, Science, Trippy, Music, Gods, Art. Anything that one could use as a tool to survive yesterday, today, and tomorrow.


Web: www.afrofuturistaffair.com
Email: AfrofuturistAffair@gmail.com
Twitter: www.twitter.com/afrofuturaffair
Tumblr: www.afrofuturistaffair.tumblr.com
Youtube: www.youtube.com/afrofuturistaffair

Books on Science Fiction and Black Speculative Critical Analysis

1. The Black Imagination: Science Fiction, Futurism and the Speculative (Black Studies and Critical Thinking) (2011) by Sandra Jackson - This critical collection covers a broad spectrum of works, both literary and cinematic, and issues from writers, directors, and artists who claim the science fiction, speculative fiction, and Afro-futurist genres.

2. Black Space: Imagining Race in Science Fiction Film (2008) by Adilifu Nama - The first book-length study of African American representation in science fiction film, Black Space demonstrates that SF cinema has become an important field of racial analysis, a site where definitions of race can be contested and post-civil rights race relations (re)imagined.

3. Race in American Science Fiction (2011) by Isiah Lavender III - Race in American Science Fiction offers a systematic classification of ways that race appears and how it is silenced in science fiction, while developing a critical vocabulary designed to focus attention on often-overlooked racial implications. These focused readings of science fiction contextualize race within the genre’s better-known master narratives and agendas.

4. Horror Noire: Blacks in American Horror Films from 1890s to Present (2011) by Robin Means Coleman - Horror Noire presents a unique social history of blacks in America through changing images in horror films. Throughout the text, the reader is encouraged to unpack the genre’s racialized imagery, as well as the narratives that make up popular culture’s commentary on race. Offering a comprehensive chronological survey of the genre, this book addresses a full range of black horror films, including mainstream Hollywood fare, as well as art-house films, Blaxploitation films, direct-to-DVD films, and the emerging U.S./hip-hop culture-inspired Nigerian “Nollywood” Black horror films.

Time Travel Convention | Pt. 2 - Activation * Recurrence Plot Book Release features a sound installation built by Moor Mother Goddess w/ a 7-track collection corresponding to Recurrence Plot novel debuting April 5 at Yell Gallery. You can hear the tracks now at https://soundcloud.com/AfroFuturist-affair/sets/recurrence-plot and be sure to listen again with the book in hand.

Time Travel Convention | Pt. 2 - Activation * Recurrence Plot Book Release features a sound installation built by Moor Mother Goddess w/ a 7-track collection corresponding to Recurrence Plot novel debuting April 5 at Yell Gallery. You can hear the tracks now at https://soundcloud.com/AfroFuturist-affair/sets/recurrence-plot and be sure to listen again with the book in hand.

The term “Afrofuturism” is normally attributed to Mark Dery, coined in an interview with Samuel Delany, Greg Tate, and Tricia Rose that appeared in South Atlantic Quarterly in 1993, but even without this term to hand, Mark Sinker was outlining a specifically black sf in the pages of The Wire the year before. To many readers of SFS, Sinker’s pantheon of black sf—which included Samuel Delany and Octavia Butler, as well as Sun Ra, Public Enemy, John Coltrane, Anthony Braxton, Miles Davis, Wayne Shorter, Jimi Hendrix, Afrika Bambaataa, Ishmael Reed, and Earth Wind and Fire—might not sound much like the sf we know. But sf is “a point of cultural departure” for all of these writers and musicians, because “it allows for a series of worst-case futures—of hells-on-Earth and being in them—which are woven into every kind of everyday present reality” (“Loving the Alien”). The “central fact” of the black sf they produce “is an acknowledgement that Apocalypse already happened,” that, in Public Enemy’s words, “Armageddon been in effect.”

Taking in contemporary music and sf, Sinker positions hip-hop in “the grand syncretic tradition of bebop, not ashamed to acknowledge that technological means and initial building material are always simply what falls to hand: but that meaning is nonetheless a matter of energetic and visionary redeployment, not who first owned or made this or that fragment” (“Loving the Alien”). Although cyberpunk has typically been discussed in terms of European avant-garde detournement or Burroughsian cut-up, its parallels and affinities with bebop and hip-hop3 have generally gone unacknowledged. Sinker does more than merely point to this omission, however. Just as Thomas Foster argues that cyberpunk “didn’t so much die as experience a sea change into a more generalized cultural formation” (xiv), so Sinker suggests that the black, urban, proletarian experience central to the development of these musical forms speaks directly to the experience of the global underclass created by the intertwined logics of capital, Empire, and race: more-or-less concomitant with the growth of hip-hop, cyberpunk, the “radical leading edge” of “white SF,” was “arguing that the planet, already turned Black, must embrace rather than resist this [relationship to technology]: that … only ways of technological interaction inherited from the jazz and now the rap avant garde can reintegrate humanity with the runaway machine age.”

By from “The Ships Landed Long Ago: Afrofuturism and Black SF" by Mark Bould 

Leeway Foundation Presents: Emergent Strategies: Speculative Fiction & Radical Organizing

Join Leeway Foundation on December 8 to welcome writer and cultural organizer Adrienne Maree Brown for a lively conversation inspired by the work of visionary, post-apocalyptic, science-fiction author Octavia Butler. This discussion will explore the visionary qualities of science/speculative fiction with radical community organizing practice using Butler’s work.Butler’s writing in The Parable series and other works instigates and provokes new thinking about how we can bring into being the kind of society that we want and expands what we might imagine. Through her protagonists, Butler illustrated adaptive, intuitive, shared leadership in practice. This recurrent theme, dubbed “Emergent Strategy,” will be a key focus of the afternoon’s discussion.The event is free, but you must RSVP at http://leewayemergent.eventbrite.com/About AdrienneAdrienne is a 2013 Kresge Literary Arts Fellow writing science fiction in Detroit. She is co-editor, with poet/activist Walidah Imarisha, of the forthcoming anthology Octavia’s Brood: Science Fiction Stories from Social Justice Movements She has helped to launch the Octavia Butler and Emergent Strategy Reading Network for people interested in reading Octavia’s work from a political and strategic framework, and is building with the Octavia Butler Legacy Network on other ways of extending Butler’s work.This workshop is presented in partnership with the following organizations: The AfroFuturist Affair, Apiary Magazine, ART SANCTUARY, Blackprint, Bread & Roses Community Fund, GriotWorks, Media Mobilizing Project, Metropolarity, Myth Media Studios, Thread Makes Blanket, and Training for Change.

Join Leeway Foundation on December 8 to welcome writer and cultural organizer Adrienne Maree Brown for a lively conversation inspired by the work of visionary, post-apocalyptic, science-fiction author Octavia Butler. This discussion will explore the visionary qualities of science/speculative fiction with radical community organizing practice using Butler’s work.

Butler’s writing in The Parable series and other works instigates and provokes new thinking about how we can bring into being the kind of society that we want and expands what we might imagine. Through her protagonists, Butler illustrated adaptive, intuitive, shared leadership in practice. This recurrent theme, dubbed “Emergent Strategy,” will be a key focus of the afternoon’s discussion.

The event is free, but you must RSVP at http://leewayemergent.eventbrite.com/

About Adrienne

Adrienne is a 2013 Kresge Literary Arts Fellow writing science fiction in Detroit. She is co-editor, with poet/activist Walidah Imarisha, of the forthcoming anthology Octavia’s Brood: Science Fiction Stories from Social Justice Movements She has helped to launch the Octavia Butler and Emergent Strategy Reading Network for people interested in reading Octavia’s work from a political and strategic framework, and is building with the Octavia Butler Legacy Network on other ways of extending Butler’s work.

This workshop is presented in partnership with the following organizations: The AfroFuturist Affair, Apiary Magazine, ART SANCTUARY, Blackprint, Bread & Roses Community FundGriotWorksMedia Mobilizing ProjectMetropolarity, Myth Media Studios, Thread Makes Blanket, and Training for Change.

From the origins of the genres, images of Black people in fantasy, horror and science fiction or speculative fiction (SF) have been inauthentic at best in the imaginations of white creators. From the “Fantastic Voyages” of the 1700s where Black pirates kidnapped white explorers to far off “alien” lands, to technologically advanced futures where Black people didn’t exist in any significant population, to post-nuclear holocaust America where modern Blacks took on aggressive pre-civilized behaviors, many of these ideas have created lasting impressions in the minds of their audiences and future creators. And though there were a few attempts by some white writers to use the genres for social commentary, for instance on race relations, these efforts were few and far in between.

There is however a significant output of work by Black creators, who used the techniques and themes of the genres to write alternative stories and to produce films that spoke closer to the realities of Black life. At the turn of the 20th century, Black writers wrote utopian and fantastical novels set during the days of slavery and Reconstruction. Independent Black filmmakers created low budget feature films exploring the effects of science and fantastical religious beliefs on the Black imagination. Harlem Renaissance writers jumped into the genre with “mad scientist” and “end of the world” scenarios commenting on the American race relations. In the 1960’s and 1970’s, two powerful and original voices emerged in the SF world writing tales with more inclusive pasts, presents and futures. Also in the 1970s, Black anti-heroes utilized science and the supernatural to secure Black justice. And later, there was the emergence of Black superheroes, who, though ready, willing and able to save the entire universe, first had to fight a homogenous industry.

Brought to life via interviews, film and event clips, text, graphics, music and narration, this documentary ultimately reveals that though often intermittent and mostly unseen, there is a canon of artistic work by Black creators in the SF genres, creating a universe all its own.

Dark Phase Space Spotlight On: M. Asli Dukan | Invisible Universe Documentary

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ARTIST

M. Asli Dukan / producer and director 
DARK PHASE SPACE PRESENTATION
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ARTIST STATEMENT
M. Asli Dukan is a producer, director and editor from New York City. She graduated from The City University of New York with a Master of Fine Arts degree in Media and Communication Arts in 1999 where she received the best editing award for her thesis film, Sleeping on a train in Motion. Her media works have screened at the Blowin’ Up A Spot Film Festival and the M.A.L.I. Women’s Film and Performing Arts Conference in Dallas and Austin, Texas; OnyxCon and the Octavia E. Butler Celebration of the Fantastic Arts in Atlanta, Georgia; Citivisions and the Imagenation Film & Music Festivalin New York City; the Black to the Future Science Fiction Festival and the Langston Hughes Film Festival in Seattle, Washington; and on Move the Frame, a community television program based in New York City. She received a grant from the Kitchen Table Giving Circle in 2012 and received an Urban Artist Initiative Grant/NYC in 2009. In 2000, she founded Mizan Media Productions to produce short and feature length films and music videos. She has produced and directed several music videos, including Boot for Tamar-kali and Do You Mind for Hanifah Walidah, which debuted on LOGO in 2008. In addition to the feature length documentary, Invisible Universe, she is in development on the feature length anthology horror film, Skin Folk based on the book by award winning SF writer, Nalo Hopkinson.

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ARTIST PORTALS
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M. Asli Dukan, filmmaker and creator of Invisible Universe Documentary, will be featured at AfroFuturist Affair 2013 Charity & Costume Ball: Dark Phase Space. She will be screening clips of Invisible Universe, as well as filming parts of the Ball to add into the documentary! 

Reblogged from materialworld  103 notes
materialworld:


In the loosely defined movement of afrofuturism artists use the imagery and language of science-fiction to construct visual narratives about identity, politics, and technology. Coined by cultural critics aiming to draw a connective thread through the work of artists and writers such as Parliament-Funkadelic, Sun Ra, Samuel R. Delany and Octavia Butler, afrofuturism re-examines technology through the lens of ‘the other’ Space is the Place features a mix of new, recent and historical work from Guillermo Gómez-Peña, David Huffman, Wendy Red Star and Saya Woolfalk in an investigation of the evolution and maturation of afrofuturism as these artists break away from the movement’s original constraints. All four artists create distinct landscapes and narratives that examine ‘the other’ in radically different ways. Together, these works form a constellation of new perspectives that explore the boundaries between fantasy and identity, drawing attention to how these themes affect our day-to-day social interactions.

(via Space is the Place - Saya Woolfalk, Wendy Red Star, Guillermo Gómez-Peña, David Huffman - Exhibitions Events)

materialworld:

In the loosely defined movement of afrofuturism artists use the imagery and language of science-fiction to construct visual narratives about identity, politics, and technology. Coined by cultural critics aiming to draw a connective thread through the work of artists and writers such as Parliament-Funkadelic, Sun Ra, Samuel R. Delany and Octavia Butler, afrofuturism re-examines technology through the lens of ‘the other’ Space is the Place features a mix of new, recent and historical work from Guillermo Gómez-Peña, David Huffman, Wendy Red Star and Saya Woolfalk in an investigation of the evolution and maturation of afrofuturism as these artists break away from the movement’s original constraints. All four artists create distinct landscapes and narratives that examine ‘the other’ in radically different ways. Together, these works form a constellation of new perspectives that explore the boundaries between fantasy and identity, drawing attention to how these themes affect our day-to-day social interactions.

(via Space is the Place - Saya Woolfalk, Wendy Red Star, Guillermo Gómez-Peña, David Huffman - Exhibitions Events)