A community formed to celebrate, strengthen, and promote Afrofuturistic and Black Scifi culture through creative events and creative writing www.afrofuturistaffair.com
One critical point underlying Afrofuturism is the persistence of the Black existence into the as-yet-undefined future, so that even if Afrofuturism changes its name, the foundation will persist. We stand at a critical point in this thing called history where we can freeze the moment and recognize our abilities to manipulate the collective timeline for positive change. Creating the future, defining the meaning of the future and our existence in it, I believe, is the power of Afrofuturism. And so Afrofuturism and the concepts connected to it must always be here, if we are to be here. And I believe we will be."

quantumfuturism:

A New Wave of Black Filmmaking: Experimental and Black Speculative Indie Films

A brief survey of the contemporary Black independent film scene yields a long and ever-growing list of experimental and Black speculative (including horror, Afrofuturism, sci-fi, fantasy, fan fiction) short cinema, film trailers, music videos, and other film projects

Recurrence Plot Review

blackgirlnerds:

RecurrencePlot-Y_B_W__zpsa6a81655

Recurrence Plot, a fitting title by the author Rasheedah Phillips opens with an introduction of a young mother named Mia, who feels like her family legacy will be suicide and underage pregnancies. As I read on, it is filled with astronomy knowledge and psychological remedies that are being installed in Mia’s daughter Khepri.

There’s implication that Khepri is nothing like her family history.…

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Blerd Bookstore Struggle + 10 Black Speculative Fiction Anthologies

Whenever I step inside of a bookstore, my first stop is always the science fiction section. Routinely, I’ll do a scan for my favorite Black science fiction authors, and nine times out of 10, Octavia Butler, Tananarive Due, Samuel Delany and other popular Black science fiction authors have been placed on the African-American literature shelves. This seems to send a very clear message to readers: Black authors who write science fiction are somehow “other.” These stories are not considered traditional science fiction or aren’t really science fiction at all; it belongs, instead in the special interest, ethnic, or diversity categories of the bookstore. The categories that usually take up the least amount of space in the room, as if we have fewer stories to tell.

I’ve always considered the term “science fiction,” as applied to writing, film and other speculative media involving scientific concerns, to be somewhat inadequate. It has always seemed to me that the worlds created within the pages or upon the screen are literally written into existence, brought to life, fully functioning and self-sustaining in the imaginations and minds of the viewers and readers, whereas the term “fiction” would seem to deny the world its possibility of being.

Science fiction also denotes a false sense of cause and effect, as though the writing or film is influenced by the field of science in a unilateral direction, instead of both science and speculative works being mutually influenced by each other. Science and technology have benefitted from the imaginations of science fiction writers as much as the reverse, and many sci-fi writers are, in fact, scientists, or are consulted by scientists when their work predicts the future or thinks up new possibilities and uses for technology. Many of the words and terms that we believe to have been fashioned in a laboratory, such as “zero gravity,” “ion drive,” and “robotics” were first used in science-fiction stories, and subsequently integrated into science jargon. And any sci-fi writer will tell you that extensive research into the scientific area that your story is focused on is crucial and perpetual. Likely, the same is true for other artists and performers whose works are speculative or science fictional in nature.

In this ongoing examination, we will look at the use of technology in the writings and art of popular and contemporary Black speculative writers and artists, what the technology comments on or correspond to in reality, how that technology anticipates some later development in science, or how the work expands or redefines the meaning of technology.

Black No More: Being an Account of the Strange and Wonderful Workings of Science in the Land of the Free, AD 1933-1940 written in 1931 by George Schuyler, tells the story of a technology invented by a Black scientist named Dr. Crookman that changes a Black person into a white person. The transforming technology seems to anticipate the skin-bleaching phenomenon that would later grip societies all around the world. Although many sources trace skin-lightening techniques back to ancient times, skin-lightening cream did not come into mass production until the 1960s. In 1940, it was discovered that the chemical compound hydroquinone would depigment skin in people of color wearing rubber gloves made of the compound. In 1978, the Food and Drug Administration would issue proposed rules for over-the-counter drugs containing hydroquinone, which included skin-bleaching products. The chemical has since been banned in several countries, but remains available over the counter in the United States if it contains the chemical below a certain percentage. In Schuyler’s time, just as in 2014, lighter skin means a higher rung on the social hierarchy, along with better social and economic opportunities. Crookman’s machine, described as “a cross between a dentist’s chair and an electric chair,” also anticipates the use of cosmetic surgery to alter appearance. The technology in the novel changes not only the Black person’s skin pigmentation, but hair texture and color, nose and lips.

In her short story Like Daughter (appearing in the Dark Matter anthology), speculative author Tananarive Due paints an eerie picture of “designer babies” taken to its most extreme conclusion. Synthesizing the concepts of genetics, epigenetics, trauma and memory, Due’s story, released in 2001, seems to anticipate the use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis to pre-select preferred qualities of a child, such as its eye color and gender, and advances in assisted reproductive technology that could eventually allow parents to genetically engineer a child.

Amiri Baraka has two works in particular which are a speculative re-imagining of the function and use of technology. Rhythm Travel, also found in the Dark Matter anthology, envisions a way of traversing space-time that allows the traveler to “be the music,” disappearing and reappearing wherever and whenever the music is played. This 1996 story is an interesting parallel to Baraka’s earlier 1969 essay Technology and Ethos, where he calls for us to dramatically redefine and create new technologies that push beyond the boundaries established by the politics of the white scientific institution. The Molecular Anyscape used in Rhythm Travel appears to be one of the machines produced by the spirit that Baraka refers to in Technology and Ethos.

What are some other uses of or comments on technology in the speculative works of Black writers, artists and performers?

By Rasheedah Phillips ( afrofuturistaffair/ metropolarity) for Blerds @ Atlanta Blackstar

Recurrence Plot  by Rasheedah Phillips
Image by Fabiola JL Photography
Prints ($10) + Books ($12.95) available for sale at www.afrofuturistaffair.com

Recurrence Plot  by Rasheedah Phillips

Image by Fabiola JL Photography

Prints ($10) + Books ($12.95) available for sale at www.afrofuturistaffair.com

This year, The AfroFuturist Affair Annual Charity & Costume Ball has expanded space-time from one evening to a month-long celebration of Afrofuturism.  In addition to the 4th Annual Costume Ball on Saturday, November 8 2014, we will have events throughout November, including workshops, dance party, readings, book club, film screenings, art exhibit, and more. We are seeking self-identified AfroFuturists to perform or display their Black sci-fi, spec-fic, and Afrofuturistic themed work at the Ball. We are also seeking submissions for workshops and presentations.
We need: Authors, Poets, Inventors, Vocalists, Rappers, Visual artists, Performance artists, Filmmakers, Dancers, Designers, Musicians, Magicians, Producers, Metaphysicians, other creatives/creators

Deadline to submit: Sunday, October 5 2014
This month we will explore the theme of Black Holographic Memory, the collective unconscious memory of Black folk through all permutations of space-time. Like a hologram, each individual contains the whole of the collective memory - we must simply learn how to access it.  We appreciate afrofuturistic and speculative works that incorporate this theme or hints at ways to access the memory hologram (however you interpret it). 
To share your ideas, talents, and proposed performances for inclusion in this year’s celebrations, please email afrofuturistaffair@gmail.com by October 5, 2014 with the below info, and “Charity Ball” in the subject line.
Name or Organization:
Contact info (email/phone):
Title of proposed performance/display/workshop:
Brief description of proposed performance/display/workshop:

If available, attach at least one image or video URL illustrating what you do. It can be a past example or a sketch of the proposed idea.
Website (if available):

If you are interested in sponsoring, vending, or volunteering, please submit an email to afrofuturistaffair@gmail.com. We are able to offer promotion and advertisement space to all sponsors. Vendors will be charged a low registration fee.
 
Photos of Past Charity Balls:
The AfroFuturist Affair Charity & Costume Ball
The Museum of Time
Dark Phase Space

This year, The AfroFuturist Affair Annual Charity & Costume Ball has expanded space-time from one evening to a month-long celebration of Afrofuturism.  In addition to the 4th Annual Costume Ball on Saturday, November 8 2014, we will have events throughout November, including workshops, dance party, readings, book club, film screenings, art exhibit, and more. We are seeking self-identified AfroFuturists to perform or display their Black sci-fi, spec-fic, and Afrofuturistic themed work at the Ball. We are also seeking submissions for workshops and presentations.

We need: Authors, Poets, Inventors, Vocalists, Rappers, Visual artists, Performance artists, Filmmakers, Dancers, Designers, Musicians, Magicians, Producers, Metaphysicians, other creatives/creators

Deadline to submit: Sunday, October 5 2014

This month we will explore the theme of Black Holographic Memory, the collective unconscious memory of Black folk through all permutations of space-time. Like a hologram, each individual contains the whole of the collective memory - we must simply learn how to access it.  We appreciate afrofuturistic and speculative works that incorporate this theme or hints at ways to access the memory hologram (however you interpret it).

To share your ideas, talents, and proposed performances for inclusion in this year’s celebrations, please email afrofuturistaffair@gmail.com by October 5, 2014 with the below info, and “Charity Ball” in the subject line.

Name or Organization:

Contact info (email/phone):

Title of proposed performance/display/workshop:

Brief description of proposed performance/display/workshop:

If available, attach at least one image or video URL illustrating what you do. It can be a past example or a sketch of the proposed idea.

Website (if available):

If you are interested in sponsoring, vending, or volunteering, please submit an email to afrofuturistaffair@gmail.com. We are able to offer promotion and advertisement space to all sponsors. Vendors will be charged a low registration fee.

Photos of Past Charity Balls:

The AfroFuturist Affair Charity & Costume Ball

The Museum of Time

Dark Phase Space

A look at the podcast scene reveals that self-described Black nerds are very active in producing all types of Internet radio shows, and in doing so, are helping to shift the image of the typical nerd to a more realistic view – that no one color, creed, culture, or gender dominates nerd culture.

metropolarity:

RECURRENCE PLOT: AND OTHER TIME TRAVEL TALES

the debut book from @afrofuturistaffair creative director & metropolarity founding member, Rasheedah Phillips  ++++++ ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

http://metropolarity.storenvy.com/products/6334621-recurrence-plot-and-other-time-travel-tales

The interweaving stories in Recurrence Plot and Other Time Travel Tales present characters whose stories challenge the notion that time flows in only one direction. If you want to understand what is happening at any given point in time, you cannot only look to the past for clues. You must consider the future.

A journalist races against time itself to expose the entity preying on young male teens in Philadelphia. A crystal, memory-storing bracelet transports a young mother back to the day of her own mother’s traumatic death. An unknown force of nature causes time to start flowing backwards…

Using quantum physics as an imaginative landscape, Phillips’ debut speculative collection Recurrence Plot attempts to walk the fine line between fiction and reality, fate and free will, and past, present, and future.

230 pages.

recurrenceplot:

afrofuturistoccasion:

#Afrofuturism and Black Scifi excellence on display @PennBookCenter. reading and discussion with @afrofuturistaffair and @theyarebirds NOW! (at Penn Book Center)

Honored to sit among the greats! In the back is Nova by Samuel Delany and The Cosmo Biography of Sun Ra by Chris Raschka
Recurrence Plot (and Other Time Travel Tales) is available for purchase online and at the following locations:

Sankofa Video, Books, and Cafe (Washington, DC)


Black and Nobel Bookstore (Philadelphia, PA)


Wooden Shoe Books and Records (Philadelphia, PA)


Brickbat Books (Philadelphia, PA)


Penn Book Center (Philadelphia, PA)


Free Library of Philadelphia (Philadelphia, PA)


Bluestockings Bookstore  (NYC)

recurrenceplot:

afrofuturistoccasion:

#Afrofuturism and Black Scifi excellence on display @PennBookCenter. reading and discussion with @afrofuturistaffair and @theyarebirds NOW! (at Penn Book Center)

Honored to sit among the greats! In the back is Nova by Samuel Delany and The Cosmo Biography of Sun Ra by Chris Raschka

Recurrence Plot (and Other Time Travel Tales) is available for purchase online and at the following locations:

We are SO proud to announce that #RecurrencePlot (and Other Time Travel Tales) is now available at The Free Library of Philadelphia! Go check us out, with your library card👓📚 

We are SO proud to announce that #RecurrencePlot (and Other Time Travel Tales) is now available at The Free Library of Philadelphia! Go check us out, with your library card👓📚 

afrofuturistoccasion:

RP via @BondfireRadio: Sci-fi #Afrofuturist authors @CereceRMurphy @AfroFuturAffair @DjaDjaNMedjay discuss their influences on “Afro Futurism, Sci-Fi, and Cultural Myths: A dialogue among visionary writers” at Harlem Book Fair . #HBF16 http://t.co/DON8U6KCAf (at Countee Cullen Branch Library NYPL)

afrofuturistoccasion:

RP via @BondfireRadio: Sci-fi #Afrofuturist authors @CereceRMurphy @AfroFuturAffair @DjaDjaNMedjay discuss their influences on “Afro Futurism, Sci-Fi, and Cultural Myths: A dialogue among visionary writers” at Harlem Book Fair . #HBF16 http://t.co/DON8U6KCAf (at Countee Cullen Branch Library NYPL)

airhornoftruthandlove:

metropolarity:

RECURRENCE PLOT: AND OTHER TIME TRAVEL TALES

the debut book from @afrofuturistaffair creative director & metropolarity founding member, Rasheedah Phillips  ++++++ ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

The interweaving stories in Recurrence Plot and Other Time Travel Tales present characters whose stories challenge the notion that time flows in only one direction. If you want to understand what is happening at any given point in time, you cannot only look to the past for clues. You must consider the future.

A journalist races against time itself to expose the entity preying on young male teens in Philadelphia. A crystal, memory-storing bracelet transports a young mother back to the day of her own mother’s traumatic death. An unknown force of nature causes time to start flowing backwards…

Using quantum physics as an imaginative landscape, Phillips’ debut speculative collection Recurrence Plot attempts to walk the fine line between fiction and reality, fate and free will, and past, present, and future.

230 pages.

I finally bought this today!!!!!!

thank yooouuuu