The AfroFuturist Affair is a community formed to celebrate, strengthen, and promote Afrofuturistic and Black Scifi culture through creative events and creative writing.
The Afrofuturist Affair has a correlative mission of using the proceeds from our events to fund a $500 community grant. The grant, known as The Futurist Fund will be dedicated to serving the needs of members of an under-served community annually.


The AfroFuturist Affair tumblr provides friends, supporters, historians, and aliens with archives on the first event, updates on Afro-future events, present goings-ons, and to exchange language, images, memories, notes, and energies with other Futurists across cyberspace/time. We practice and revere Ancient Wisdom, Mythology, Liberation, History, Future, Metaphysics, Sacred Math, Prophecy, Science, Trippy, Music, Gods, Art. Anything that one could use as a tool to survive yesterday, today, and tomorrow.


Web: www.afrofuturistaffair.com
Email: AfrofuturistAffair@gmail.com
Twitter: www.twitter.com/afrofuturaffair
Tumblr: www.afrofuturistaffair.tumblr.com
Youtube: www.youtube.com/afrofuturistaffair
Reblogged from afutureancient  43 notes

Art of This World: Renee Cox’s ‘Sacred Geometry’

afutureancient:

Art of This World: Renee Cox’s ‘Sacred Geometry’

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Self-Portrait of Renee Cox

Jamaican-American visual artist Renee Cox recently released her latest collection of work, Sacred Geometry: where she turns bodies of various people into mandala-inspired geometric fractal patterns. Given several of the stories I have heard lately in the news, her work is again relevant, reinforcing the divine power and value of ourselves, our cultures, our…

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Reblogged from poczineproject  56 notes

#IZM2013 ZINE MUST-READ: FIRE!! Devoted To Younger Negro Artists (1926)

poczineproject:

Today’s International Zine Month suggested activity is to reread your favorite zines and remind yourself why you love them so much. Here’s a favorite from our archive: 

In the spirit of #IZM2013, we are excited to announce that the first zine in POC Zine Project’s Legacy Series, FIRE!! Devoted To Younger Negro Artists (1926), is now available to read online, for free:

POCZP helped to liberate this groundbreaking zine by people of color from 1926 in collaboration with firepress.com

ABOUT FIRE!! Devoted To Younger Negro Artists

In November of 1926, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Wallace Thurman, Aaron Douglas, Richard Bruce Nugent, Gwendolyn Bennett and John P. Davis released FIRE!!.

Excerpt from description on harlemsreflection.tumblr.com:

Fire!! was conceived with the notion of expressing the Black experience during the Harlem Renaissance in a modern and realistic fashion, using literature as a vehicle of enlightenment. The authors of this magazine wanted an arena to express the changing attitudes of younger African Americans and used Fire!! to facilitate the exploration of issues in the Black community that were not in the forefront of mainstream African American society such as homosexuality, bisexuality, interracial relationships, promiscuity, prostitution, and color prejudice within the Black community itself.

The publication was so named, according to Langston Hughes, “to burn up a lot of the old, dead conventional Negro-white ideas of the past … into a realization of the existence of the younger Negro writers and artists, and provide us with an outlet for publication not available in the limited pages of the small Negro magazines then existing.” Ironically, the magazine’s headquarters burned to the ground shortly after releasing its first issue.

We’re kicking off our Legacy Series initiative next week by celebrating and analyzing FIRE!! in a series of multimedia posts (read our original Legacy Series announcement).

Stay tuned for more coverage, but in the meantime, enjoy and share this digital version of FIRE!!

- POC Zine Project

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

Reblogged from afrofuturistaffair  21 notes
afrofuturistaffair:

CHANNEL ZERO - A FUTURIST AFFAIR
Channel Zero defeats the flesh. Yesterday is gone. It is a celebration of sonics that stretch the ear. It’s a cracked statue in a museum. Quantum emotional exploration. Channel Zero will collaborate with the Philly-based Rasheedah Phillips and Moor Mother Goddess of The AfroFuturist Affair.A-typical DJ Sets by:DJ Underdog Native Sun  Words by:Rasheedah Phillips of The AfroFuturist Affair/Black Quantum Futurism/Metropolarity  Sounds by:Moor Mother GoddessJohn Moon  Luke Stewart  Styles by: Katrina X Negist  Expect everything AND nothing 

TONIGHT

afrofuturistaffair:

CHANNEL ZERO - A FUTURIST AFFAIR

Channel Zero defeats the flesh. Yesterday is gone. It is a celebration of sonics that stretch the ear. It’s a cracked statue in a museum. Quantum emotional exploration.

Channel Zero will collaborate with the Philly-based Rasheedah Phillips and Moor Mother Goddess of The AfroFuturist Affair.

A-typical DJ Sets by:
DJ Underdog
Native Sun

Words by:
Rasheedah Phillips of The AfroFuturist Affair/Black Quantum Futurism/Metropolarity

Sounds by:
Moor Mother Goddess
John Moon
Luke Stewart

Styles by:
Katrina X
Negist

Expect everything AND nothing

TONIGHT

Reblogged from medievalpoc  23,355 notes
teachingliteracy:

yasboogie:
7-Year-Old Zora Ball Is the World’s Youngest Game Programmer
The youngest person to create a full version of a mobile application video game. A first grader at Philadelphia’s Harambee Institute of Science and Technology Charter School, she’s already more accomplished than everyone you know.
Ball built the app in the Bootstrap programming language, and unveiled her game at FATE’s “Bootstrap Expo” at the University of Pennsylvania.
Apparently some grumpy olds were suspicious that her older brother was really the mastermind behind the program, but Zora showed them. When asked to reconfigure the app on the spot, Ball showed naysayers what was up when she executed the request perfectly.
“We expect great things from Zora, as her older brother, Trace Ball, is a past STEM Scholar of the Year,” said Harambee Science Teacher Tariq Al-Nasir. No pressure, baby geniuses, but there’s an entire world for you to save. Please hurry.
[ht @Jezebel via @PhillyTrib]

teachingliteracy:

yasboogie:

7-Year-Old Zora Ball Is the World’s Youngest Game Programmer

The youngest person to create a full version of a mobile application video game. A first grader at Philadelphia’s Harambee Institute of Science and Technology Charter School, she’s already more accomplished than everyone you know.

Ball built the app in the Bootstrap programming language, and unveiled her game at FATE’s “Bootstrap Expo” at the University of Pennsylvania.

Apparently some grumpy olds were suspicious that her older brother was really the mastermind behind the program, but Zora showed them. When asked to reconfigure the app on the spot, Ball showed naysayers what was up when she executed the request perfectly.

“We expect great things from Zora, as her older brother, Trace Ball, is a past STEM Scholar of the Year,” said Harambee Science Teacher Tariq Al-Nasir. No pressure, baby geniuses, but there’s an entire world for you to save. Please hurry.

[ht @Jezebel via @PhillyTrib]

Reblogged from newmodelminority  77 notes

krysfree:

REAL TALK: Why Women Coders Matter

A panel of Bay Area based women coders, educators, and entrepreneurs who will share projects they’re working on, insights about what excites them in technology, and stories about what they’ve experienced to bring more women into tech careers. 

Learn more about the event and panelists on the BAVC website.

The Future Weird: an interview with Derica Shields

blackgirlsarefromthefuture:

blackgirlstalking:

BGT is approaching its second birthday (we can’t believe it!) and we’re delighted to have a new team member joining us as we move into our second year and continue to expand. Fanta Sylla has joined BGT as our new community manager, and as you’ll see from the interview below which she conducted, Fanta is a wonderful addition to the BGT crew. Fatima, Ramou, Aurelia and Alesia will still continue to post content and, of course, record the podcast and you can still always reach us all here or through Twitter. Welcome Fanta!

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Creating a space to show films which document the future from a non-western, non-white and queer perspective, that was the desire behind THE FUTURE WEIRD a film screening series co-founded by Derica Shields and Megan Eardley that explores experimental, speculative and sci-fi films from Africa, the Global South or directed by people of color. We discussed this project with Derica Shields, as well as the concept of what is weird, and whether the future should be saved. — interviewed by f. sylla

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Black Girls Talking: Remote Control is the fifth instalment of THE FUTURE WEIRD after Non-Resident Aliens, Supra-Planetary Sovereigns and Visions of Excess. Can you talk about this project and what the inspiration was behind it?

Derica Shields: The Future Weird was born in July 2013 and there have been five programs: Visions of Excess; In Search of a Black Atlantis; Supra-planetary Sovereigns collaboration with Spectacle Theater); Remote Control; and Non-Resident Aliens.

The Future Weird emerged from a number of desires. I’d been wanting to do a screening series for a really long time. There were so many films by black and brown directors which I’d heard about but couldn’t find anywhere, or which I had seen and thought were interesting but they had not secured distribution. So one aim was just to screen these films because they weren’t readily available online or in theatres.

When I thinking about the screenings, I was keen to get away from a tendency I’d noticed to treat African film as though it’s a genre. I’m increasingly compelled by the move to theorise from the global south, rather than the north/West and wanted to have a space where we could privilege the conversations among black and brown people, without the constant reference to whiteness that emerges as a norm in white dominated spaces. So the screenings are organised thematically, and in that way, they tend to follow certain trains of thought or circle around ideas. “In Search of a Black Atlantis” came out of thinking I’d been doing while at grad school and before, since I’ve long been obsessed with water as a site of black cultural memory, loss, forgetting and rebirth. The films look at water as a cleansing force, what returns to us in the water as detritus, and as a site of myth too - black mermaids, mami water, drexciya/atlantis.

Another reason was that I’d moved to New York and it was lonely. I wanted to find people I could talk with about the things I was thinking about. In some part I also wanted to watch these films with other people rather than have this atomized YouTube viewing experience.

BGT: How do you select your films?

Shields: I usually have one or two films that are in my head at any given time, and then I’ll tease out threads from it and try and find points of connection with other films that I’ve seen or read about. Sometimes it involves lots of casting about - writing to people asking them to send you screeners of their films.  I also keep a notebook with a list of films I want to screen and I’ll look over that looking for the nexus of interrelations.

BGT: What is your definition of weird?

Shields: Weird means unruly, uncontained, and situated outside of the mainstream, or at an awkward angle to it. Weird is the creative invention of the marginalised majority. It’s like, people from populations who are exposed to destitution and premature death and organised abandonment are making things. I’m not trying to say that every black, brown, woman or queer filmmaker is from an abject social position, but currently our systems of recognition still fail to register black, brown, queer, trans* work as work, or art as art, or thinking as thinking.  With The Future Weird I want people to get in a room and talk about the work itself, not just to “celebrate” it in this liberal way which is like a pat on the head, but to say “hey we recognise your art/work/thinking and we are here to talk and think about it.”

The word weird also invites invention and reimagination rather than acceptance of the terms already on offer. Weird means an end to bargaining for inclusion on other people’s terms, and in turn, struggling towards your own terms for art, thought, politics, prosperity…. As a younger person I was definitely weird, but I as I got older I increasingly caved to the discipline of fancy universities, I stopped being weird, which meant that I stopped demanding what seemed impossible. But imagining and then demanding what seems impossible is so powerful, especially when our world is so inadequate and deadly.

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I hung with Derica this summer during World Cup season. She is brilliant, whip smart, gorgeous and Lovely.