A community formed to celebrate, strengthen, and promote Afrofuturistic and Black Scifi culture through creative events and creative writing www.afrofuturistaffair.com
doormouseetcappendix:

The Vodu (The Orishas) Marvel’s Gods Of Africa 

doormouseetcappendix:

The Vodu (The Orishas) Marvel’s Gods Of Africa 

Otherworldly Videos: The Spirit in Music - Vaudou Game + Ibeyi

afutureancient:

Vaudou (Voudou, Voodoo, Vodun, etc.) and Yoruba Orisha religions have spread all over the world despite efforts to quiet it and here are two musical acts who incorporate the spirituality from the various variations, related and descended religions, like Santeria, Lucumi, or Candomble into their work. First is Vaudou Game’s “Pas Contente”video and their genre of Vodun Funk. “The band of six is led…

View On WordPress

fvalorsa:

KANAVAL: Vodou, Politics and Revolution on the streets of Haiti

Photography: Leah Gordon

Soul Jazz Publishing

Basic Instructions Before Leaving Earth: Elizabeth Nunez ‘s Books of Caribbean Magic

afutureancient:

Basic Instructions Before Leaving Earth: Elizabeth Nunez ‘s Books of Caribbean Magic #books #caribbean #afrofuturism

Next week, Elizabeth Nunez will be read from her memoir, Not for Everyday Use, at the fifth annual ringShout event, which will be the Brooklyn Book Festival Bookend event. The event will take place September 16 at 7pm at the Franklin Park Bar and Beer Garden in Brooklyn, and also features Bridgett M. Davis (Into the Go-Slow), Saeed Jones (Prelude to Bruise), and Lauren Francis-Sharma (‘Til the…

View On WordPress

theafrofuturist:

AWESOMENESS I am just buzzing this week from excitement, too many amazing things going down over here! First, I saw the Sun Ra Arkestra led by (Uncle) Marshall Allen at the Gehry bandshell in Millennium Park for the Chicago Jazz Festival finale. Blew my mind, rocked my world! Words cannot describe! And a beautiful rooftop after-set, too, where I was honored to meet the musicians and spend time with (cousin) Stan West and family. All in all, a most beautiful evening!
And the beat goes on! Here’s a taste of what’s coming on down the line in the very near future:
• September 25:  Featured Speaker for WebVisions Chicago 2014 on “The MARS Project: Teaching Afro-Futurism as Methodology of Black Liberation”
• October 2 & October 24:  Introduction to Afro-Futurism (with Floyd Webb and Ytasha Womack, October 2) and Introduction to Space Is The Place (October 24) for “Afro-Futurism and Sci-Fi”, Watershed Media Centre, Bristol, UK
• November 1: “Voyaging the Fantastic: Afrosurrealism and Afrofuturism in Wangechi Mutu and Contemporary Black Art”, moderated by Alexander Weheliye with panelists D. Denenge Akpem, Krista Franklin, Cauleen Smith, Block Museum of Art, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
• November 21: Speaker for Black to the Future conference on “The MARS Project: Teaching Afro-Futurism as Methodology of Black Liberation”, with keynote by Dr. Alondra Nelson, Purdue University, IN
• November 2014: Radio Pacifica Interview with Kali-Ahmet Amen on Afro-Futurism and Black Aesthetics, Atlanta, GA
…and more to come!
So excited and honored to be a part of these brilliant programs. Thanks to all!
Peace and light,
Denenge
 Photo of Sun Ra Arkestra by Ken Weiss

theafrofuturist:

AWESOMENESS
I am just buzzing this week from excitement, too many amazing things going down over here! First, I saw the Sun Ra Arkestra led by (Uncle) Marshall Allen at the Gehry bandshell in Millennium Park for the Chicago Jazz Festival finale. Blew my mind, rocked my world! Words cannot describe! And a beautiful rooftop after-set, too, where I was honored to meet the musicians and spend time with (cousin) Stan West and family. All in all, a most beautiful evening!

And the beat goes on! Here’s a taste of what’s coming on down the line in the very near future:

• September 25:
Featured Speaker for WebVisions Chicago 2014 on “The MARS Project: Teaching Afro-Futurism as Methodology of Black Liberation”

• October 2 & October 24:
Introduction to Afro-Futurism (with Floyd Webb and Ytasha Womack, October 2) and Introduction to Space Is The Place (October 24) for “Afro-Futurism and Sci-Fi”, Watershed Media Centre, Bristol, UK

• November 1:
“Voyaging the Fantastic: Afrosurrealism and Afrofuturism in Wangechi Mutu and Contemporary Black Art”, moderated by Alexander Weheliye with panelists D. Denenge Akpem, Krista Franklin, Cauleen Smith, Block Museum of Art, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

• November 21:
Speaker for Black to the Future conference on “The MARS Project: Teaching Afro-Futurism as Methodology of Black Liberation”, with keynote by Dr. Alondra Nelson, Purdue University, IN

• November 2014:
Radio Pacifica Interview with Kali-Ahmet Amen on Afro-Futurism and Black Aesthetics, Atlanta, GA

…and more to come!

So excited and honored to be a part of these brilliant programs. Thanks to all!

Peace and light,

Denenge


Photo of Sun Ra Arkestra by Ken Weiss

clairelaura:

H A A R A
Tribute to Ojeikere
Press kit
-
clairelaura

Fledgling

blackgirlslovebooks:

image

Fledgling by Octavia Butler

Fledgling, is the story of an apparently young, amnesiac girl whose alarmingly un-human needs and abilities lead her to a startling conclusion: she is in fact a genetically modified, 53-year-old vampire. Forced to discover what she can about her stolen former life, she must at the same time learn who wanted—and still wants—to destroy her and those she cares for, and how she can save herself. Fledgling is a captivating novel that tests the limits of “otherness” and questions what it means to be truly human.

Buy here

dynamicafrica:

Today, September 8th, is the 60th birthday of Ruby Nell Bridges - a woman who, being the first black child to attend an all-white school in New Orleans in 1960, underwent a traumatizing ordeal that came to signify the deeply troubled state of race relations in America.

On her first day of school at William Frantz Elementary School, during a 1997 NewsHour interview Bridges recalled that she was perplexed by the site that befell, thinking that it was some sort of Mardi Gras celebration:

"Driving up I could see the crowd, but living in New Orleans, I actually thought it was Mardi Gras. There was a large crowd of people outside of the school. They were throwing things and shouting, and that sort of goes on in New Orleans at Mardi Gras.”

Only six-years-old at the time, little Ruby had to deal with a slew of disgusting and violent harassment, beginning with threats of violence that prompted then President Eisenhower to dispatch U.S Marshals as her official escorts, to teachers refusing to teach her and a woman who put a black baby doll in a coffin and demonstrated outside the school in protest of Ruby’s presence there. This particular ordeal had a profound effect on young Ruby who said that it “scared me more than the nasty things people screamed at us.”

Only one teacher, Barbara Henry, would teach Ruby and did so for over a year with Ruby being the only pupil in her class.

The Bridges family suffered greatly for their brave decision. Her father lost his job, they were barred from shopping at their local grocery store, her grandparents, who were sharecroppers, were forcibly removed from their land, not to mention the psychological effect this entire ordeal had on her family. There were, however, members of their community - both black and white - who gathered behind the Bridges family in a show of support, including providing her father with a new job and taking turns to babysit Ruby.

Part of her experience was immortalized in a 1964 Norman Rockwell painting, pictured above, titled The Problem We All Live With. Her entire story was made into a TV movie released in 1998.

Despite the end of the segregation of schools in the United States, studies and reports show that the situation is worse now than it was in the 1960s.

Today, still living in New Orleans, Briges works as an activist, who has spoken at TEDx, and is now chair of the Ruby Bridges Foundation.

saucerkommand:

Ajala by N. Steven Harris and Robert Garrett! Fantastic!

koblitron:

Concrete Park

In the future, there will  be slave ships again.

At least according to Concrete Park, a gritty and gorgeously drawn science fiction comic by Tony Puryear, and co-created by Erika Alexander (from Living Single!) and Robert Alexander.  It’s like City of God meets Firefly.  After reading the first issue, I was blown away.  The town the story is set in is appropriately called Scare City.  In this dystopian future, turfs will be formed like how they are today—through segregation, forced and “chain” migration, and extreme poverty. In this story, ethnic divides are still a very real thing.  No colorblind, whitewashed future here!

Every page was action packed, and something was always blowing up—whether it be because of beef or debt.  The characters are also beautifully drawn, and damn that dreamy Luca and her curves… <3

It’s also sad to discover how difficult the road was to get to the production of this comic. There’a a great interview between Hilton Collins and Erika Alexander over at Bleeding Cool about this. It’s goes into the problems in dealing with the racist gatekeepers that make up hollywood and mainstream media.  This was originally a movie/TV show pitch, but the team was told:

  ”black people don’t like science fiction — they don’t see themselves in the future.” 

To which, Erika goes into more detail:

Hilton: Did the executive’s words about your pitch surprise you? How did it feel to hear that?

Erika:[laughs] We were very surprised. We were actually shocked by his blatant racism. It wasn’t just that he said that black people wouldn’t like it. His assumption was that you’re only making it for black people, so that’s the problem. You have people, they give themselves the tag of white Hollywood liberals, and they can often be some of the most racist people you’ve ever met.

So far, I am loving the first issue, and I look forward to finding out the fate of the M-80s and seeing more of their planet, Oasis.  You can get Concrete Park at Dark Horse

td4td:

tarot cards from sun ra’s space is the place

This year, The AfroFuturist Affair Annual Charity &amp; Costume Ball has expanded space-time from one evening to a month-long celebration of Afrofuturism.  In addition to the 4th Annual Costume Ball on Saturday, November 8&#160;2014, we will have events throughout November, including workshops, dance party, readings, book club, film screenings, art exhibit, and more. We are seeking self-identified AfroFuturists to perform or display their Black sci-fi, spec-fic, and Afrofuturistic themed work at the Ball. We are also seeking submissions for workshops and presentations.
We need: Authors, Poets, Inventors, Vocalists, Rappers, Visual artists, Performance artists, Filmmakers, Dancers, Designers, Musicians, Magicians, Producers, Metaphysicians, other creatives/creators

Deadline to submit: Sunday, October 5&#160;2014
This month we will explore the theme of Black Holographic Memory, the collective unconscious memory of Black folk through all permutations of space-time. Like a hologram, each individual contains the whole of the collective memory - we must simply learn how to access it.  We appreciate afrofuturistic and speculative works that incorporate this theme or hints at ways to access the memory hologram (however you interpret it). 
To share your ideas, talents, and proposed performances for inclusion in this year’s celebrations, please email afrofuturistaffair@gmail.com by October 5, 2014 with the below info, and “Charity Ball” in the subject line.
Name or Organization:
Contact info (email/phone):
Title of proposed performance/display/workshop:
Brief description of proposed performance/display/workshop:

If available, attach at least one image or video URL illustrating what you do. It can be a past example or a sketch of the proposed idea.
Website (if available):

If you are interested in sponsoring, vending, or volunteering, please submit an email to afrofuturistaffair@gmail.com. We are able to offer promotion and advertisement space to all sponsors. Vendors will be charged a low registration fee.
 
Photos of Past Charity Balls:
The AfroFuturist Affair Charity &amp; Costume Ball
The Museum of Time
Dark Phase Space

This year, The AfroFuturist Affair Annual Charity & Costume Ball has expanded space-time from one evening to a month-long celebration of Afrofuturism.  In addition to the 4th Annual Costume Ball on Saturday, November 8 2014, we will have events throughout November, including workshops, dance party, readings, book club, film screenings, art exhibit, and more. We are seeking self-identified AfroFuturists to perform or display their Black sci-fi, spec-fic, and Afrofuturistic themed work at the Ball. We are also seeking submissions for workshops and presentations.

We need: Authors, Poets, Inventors, Vocalists, Rappers, Visual artists, Performance artists, Filmmakers, Dancers, Designers, Musicians, Magicians, Producers, Metaphysicians, other creatives/creators

Deadline to submit: Sunday, October 5 2014

This month we will explore the theme of Black Holographic Memory, the collective unconscious memory of Black folk through all permutations of space-time. Like a hologram, each individual contains the whole of the collective memory - we must simply learn how to access it.  We appreciate afrofuturistic and speculative works that incorporate this theme or hints at ways to access the memory hologram (however you interpret it).

To share your ideas, talents, and proposed performances for inclusion in this year’s celebrations, please email afrofuturistaffair@gmail.com by October 5, 2014 with the below info, and “Charity Ball” in the subject line.

Name or Organization:

Contact info (email/phone):

Title of proposed performance/display/workshop:

Brief description of proposed performance/display/workshop:

If available, attach at least one image or video URL illustrating what you do. It can be a past example or a sketch of the proposed idea.

Website (if available):

If you are interested in sponsoring, vending, or volunteering, please submit an email to afrofuturistaffair@gmail.com. We are able to offer promotion and advertisement space to all sponsors. Vendors will be charged a low registration fee.

Photos of Past Charity Balls:

The AfroFuturist Affair Charity & Costume Ball

The Museum of Time

Dark Phase Space

cyborgmemoirs:

metropolarity:

afrofuturistaffair:

On November 9, 2013, The AfroFuturist Affair 3rd Annual Charity & Costume Ball opened up Dark Phase Space, an evening of Afrofuture and Black Speculative inspired art, readings, performances, conversation, music, and costumery. 3 is the charm - this was the best, most energetic and most engaged  Ball we’ve thrown to date, with jaw-dropping, smile-inducing, head-nodding performances all evening long.

Part I of the photo-documentation by renegade android D1L0 DeMiLLe can be found here. You can find more of D1L0’s work on facebook and IG and tumblr. Part II soon come. 

Also, look out soon for Futurist Fund grant applications. This year’s focus of grant funds will be on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault survivors, particularly those who need help with moving costs to relocate to safer spaces. 

WISH YOU WERE T/HERE

this shit was galactic