The AfroFuturist Affair

A Charity & Costume Ball

32,384 notes

slattern:

hollywood sure has an easy time finding brown and black people to play terrorists, thugs, drug dealers, gangsters, servants, “barbarians”, hypersexualized or desexualized caricatures but all of a sudden you need a lead role and

image

gosh where did they go i swear we put them here right after zero dark thirty??

exactly.

Extensive Search Is On For Young Black Or Mixed-Race Woman To Play Major Role In ‘Star Wars: Episode VII

(Source: gaymergirls, via natecrowder)

5,626 notes

star-lawd-star:

jawnsbejawnin:

I see you white tumblr……  if you bitched over Quvenzhané Wallis, but aren’t upset about 
Gerard Butler as Set, a god of desert, storms and foreigners in ancient Egyptian religion.
Nikolaj Coster-Waldau as Horus, a god of the sky and son of Osiris.
Geoffrey Rush as Ra, a god of the sun and father of Set and Osiris
you’re a privileged douchebag. 
- @visionpoet

yup

i’m really surprised that people are surprised, as if Egyptians arent still being depicted as white and fair-skinned in history books and museum exhibits around the wide world. pretty sure this film is propaganda to reinforce the dominant historical narrative, and that theyre also captializing off of the illuminati craze. theres no sense in arguing with these people, giving energy, time, or money to them, ever.  let the movie flop. or not, whatever, because some people will go see it just because they know its wrong, or sadly because they believe its right.  continue to make and support our own and/or support mainstream films that represent us in non-stereotypical manners. - rp

star-lawd-star:

jawnsbejawnin:

I see you white tumblr……  if you bitched over Quvenzhané Wallis, but aren’t upset about 

you’re a privileged douchebag. 

- @visionpoet

yup

i’m really surprised that people are surprised, as if Egyptians arent still being depicted as white and fair-skinned in history books and museum exhibits around the wide world. pretty sure this film is propaganda to reinforce the dominant historical narrative, and that theyre also captializing off of the illuminati craze. theres no sense in arguing with these people, giving energy, time, or money to them, ever.  let the movie flop. or not, whatever, because some people will go see it just because they know its wrong, or sadly because they believe its right.  continue to make and support our own and/or support mainstream films that represent us in non-stereotypical manners. - rp

(via curatorofmoor)

93 notes

experimentaltimeorder:

metropolarity:

RECURRENCE PLOT: AND OTHER TIME TRAVEL TALES

the debut book from @afrofuturistaffair creative director & metropolarity founding member, Rasheedah Phillips  ++++++ ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

The interweaving stories in Recurrence Plot and Other Time Travel Tales present characters whose stories challenge the notion that time flows in only one direction. If you want to understand what is happening at any given point in time, you cannot only look to the past for clues. You must consider the future.

A journalist races against time itself to expose the entity preying on young male teens in Philadelphia. A crystal, memory-storing bracelet transports a young mother back to the day of her own mother’s traumatic death. An unknown force of nature causes time to start flowing backwards…

Using quantum physics as an imaginative landscape, Phillips’ debut speculative collection Recurrence Plot attempts to walk the fine line between fiction and reality, fate and free will, and past, present, and future.

230 pages.

Available for purchase  at:

AfroFuturist Affair

Metropolarity

Recurrence Plot

Filed under quantum physics trauma time travel ptsd black women scifi speculative fiction spec fic black scifi afrofuturism black speculative fiction DIY scifi independent publishing black women writers recurrence plot time machine black males Philly

24 notes

dejaqo:

My Tribe Exudes Love

Produced, Engineered and Mixed by King Britt
Written by King Britt for Cosmic Lounge Music (ASCAP)
Mixed at The Purple Room (Philly)


I have always thought of tribes holding the secrets to the universe. I look at there rituals and traditions as real technology. When looking into this images eyes, I feel the love of his community and his love for their ritual technology. The sounds chosen were futuristic meets organic and past meets present to reach the future.


Exhibition Text

As an Afrofuturist, I have always looked toward all things sci-fi, as a form of escapism. In my early years as a child growing up in Southwest Philly, this outlook on things made me a bit of an outcast, but helped me gravitate to like minded individuals. Luckily, going to school downtown, I discovered a whole new world of art, fashion and music in a magazine store called Popi’s.

My favorite part of the store was the section with Heavy Metal, Dragon and the one that changed my life, Omni. Omni showed the future now. It was where fantasy and science intersect, where the worlds we dream about become reality.

This was a major impact on how I thought about everything, including music. I would listen to Jean Michele Jarre, Manuel Gottsching and Brian Eno, while reading. This music was the soundtrack for the magazine and the images changed the way I listen to mimic.

Fast forward to now. In my music collaboration with Omni, I selected a few images that I remember or spoke to me from the archives. The particular images I ‘scored’, influenced the sounds I decided on, the sonic direction and vision. I definitely gravitated toward images, that displayed multicultural ethnicity in a science fiction and futuristic context for my collaboration.

My favorites were photos from The Man as Art article from the June 1981 issue. Malcolm Kirk photographed many natives from a tribe in New Guinea, which are breathtaking. The article explains the different modes of dress and meaning behind different jewelry and such. The main quote from the article is “In this island society, a man’s status is measured by the value of what he gives away”. So I present to you Omnipresent : A Different View.

338 notes

Fire & Clay (Book One): Islamic Sci-Fi book about Jinn

badass-bharat-deafmuslimpunkstar:

My friend, a fellow Muslim who runs Fresh Pulp, told me in email he’s currently reading a Sci-Fi novel called Fire and Clay, about Jinn. It’s written by a black Muslim woman from Detroit, her name is Kaaronica Evans-Ware. I wanna read this! I looove POC sci-fi.

Banished from her clan for being a Muslim, a 400 year-old jinn named Zamar is hiding from her past. But an ancient evil is about to surface, unearthing her secrets and carrying painful reminders of the life she once lived. Ages ago, Zamar had lived in solitary exile along the banks of the Senegal River. Then a lone man entered her world, altering it forever.

Spanning several centuries, book one of Fire & Clay, pulls you into the unseen world of mankind’s distant cousins, the jinn. Like humans, these beings were given the gift of free will. And like us there are a few that choose the way of good, some that choose the way of evil, and many that live their lives torn between the two.

But what happens when the lives of creatures cast from smokeless fire, and those shaped from the clay of the Earth become intertwined?

The story told here takes readers on a journey of mystery, imagination, and magic to search for the answers. It plunges into the depths of jealousy, fear, and greed-as well as violence, sorrow, and loss. But it also scales the heights of love and faith, hope and deliverance. This story may be fictional, but it is true. Its truths are about what it means to be human, what it means to have the power to choose.

Fire & Clay is no mere fairytale. What we can see, touch, and taste is only a narrow sliver of reality. There is a war being fought all around us, even within us. And sooner than we might think, our final battle is coming.

(Source: badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista, via oeblegacy)

7 notes

Girlfly Summer Arts & Activism Apprenticeship (SF Area)

poc-creators:

The Summer Arts & Activism Project brings together young women from the Bay Area for eight weeks. Young women ages 14-18 who are interested in performing, making positive change in the world and can commit to attending the entire program. African American, Arab, Latina, Native, Asian and Pacific Islander, low-income and LGBT-identified women are strongly encouraged to apply.

STARTS Monday,June 9th

Mission Street (off 9th Street), San Francisco, CA 94103

APPLICATIONS DUE TUESDAY APRIL 15:

Flyaway Productions,
1068 Bowdoin Street, San Francisco, CA 94134 jo@flyawayproductions.com

QUESTIONS? Contact Project Coordinator Belgica Rodriguez:

rodriguezbelgica@yahoo.com or 530-415-4335