The AfroFuturist Affair is a community formed to celebrate, strengthen, and promote Afrofuturistic and Black Scifi culture through creative events and creative writing.
The Afrofuturist Affair has a correlative mission of using the proceeds from our events to fund a $500 community grant. The grant, known as The Futurist Fund will be dedicated to serving the needs of members of an under-served community annually.


The AfroFuturist Affair tumblr provides friends, supporters, historians, and aliens with archives on the first event, updates on Afro-future events, present goings-ons, and to exchange language, images, memories, notes, and energies with other Futurists across cyberspace/time. We practice and revere Ancient Wisdom, Mythology, Liberation, History, Future, Metaphysics, Sacred Math, Prophecy, Science, Trippy, Music, Gods, Art. Anything that one could use as a tool to survive yesterday, today, and tomorrow.


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Reblogged from derica  69 notes
thefutureweird:

The Future Weird & The New Inquiry present a FREE screening of Jean-Pierre Bekolo’s sci-fi thriller Les Saignantes at the Morbid Anatomy Museum to mark the release of The New inquiry’s “Mourning” Issue.
WHEN: Saturday 30th August7PM doors + admission to Museum of Morbid Anatomy 8PM screening followed by discussion + drinks
WHERE: The Morbid Anatomy Museum, 423 Third Ave, Brooklyn, NY
RSVP on Facebook

thefutureweird:

The Future Weird & The New Inquiry present a FREE screening of Jean-Pierre Bekolo’s sci-fi thriller Les Saignantes at the Morbid Anatomy Museum to mark the release of The New inquiry’s “Mourning” Issue.

WHEN: Saturday 30th August
7PM doors + admission to Museum of Morbid Anatomy
8PM screening followed by discussion + drinks

WHERE: The Morbid Anatomy Museum, 423 Third Ave, Brooklyn, NY

RSVP on Facebook

How do we shape minds to think outside of the boxes of the oppressive cultures in which we live and develop responsible technologies? How do we cultivate cultures and critical thinking that will foster new technologies? How do we make available access to information, spaces and tools that will help people to create new technologies? A lot of how we see technology is steeped in Western thought of efficiency, progress and making capital and not how it enriches our lives, the lives of other animals, plants and the Earth. We still have a lot of unlearning to do. By

Sherese Francis ( afutureancient )

Using Afrofuturism to Power New Modes of Tech – Interview with Futuristically Ancient Blogger Sherese Francis  via Blerds - Atlanta Black Star

Reblogged from purposefulthoughts  57 notes

…Afrofuturism is a lens that renders reality via a pan-technological perspective. It views everything as a type of technology. Afrofuturism embraces the artifice and fully exploits the fact that all things that we think define us are merely constructions that function as prosthetics that produce various effects relating to their users’ needs. Throughout history, Black people, particularly oppressed Black people, have instantly noticed the affordances of various types of technology while under various forms of control. The most important affordances of these liberation technologies have always been freedom, equity, and agency. By http://www.popmatters.com/column/176055-power-up-janelle-monae-afrofuturism-and-plurality/ (via purposefulthoughts)

Reblogged from 10and5  432 notes
10and5:

Cyrus Kabiru is a self-taught Kenyan artist who works in various mediums including painting and sculpture. He is best known for his Afrofuturism series, C-Stunners, an ongoing project consisting of elaborate eyeglasses that are imaginatively constructed out of found objects and recycled trash. These wearable sculptures, part fashion statement part social-political commentary, capture the sensibility and attitude of the youth generation in Nairobi. They portray the aspiration of popular culture bling and reflect the ingenuity and resourcefulness of people. The lenses are a metaphorical filter providing a fresh perspective of the world.
Read an interview with him on 10and5: http://10and5.com/2014/08/15/fnb-joburg-art-fair-cyrus-kabiru-afrofuturism/

10and5:

Cyrus Kabiru is a self-taught Kenyan artist who works in various mediums including painting and sculpture. He is best known for his Afrofuturism series, C-Stunners, an ongoing project consisting of elaborate eyeglasses that are imaginatively constructed out of found objects and recycled trash. These wearable sculptures, part fashion statement part social-political commentary, capture the sensibility and attitude of the youth generation in Nairobi. They portray the aspiration of popular culture bling and reflect the ingenuity and resourcefulness of people. The lenses are a metaphorical filter providing a fresh perspective of the world.

Read an interview with him on 10and5: http://10and5.com/2014/08/15/fnb-joburg-art-fair-cyrus-kabiru-afrofuturism/