A community formed to celebrate, strengthen, and promote Afrofuturistic and Black Scifi culture through creative events and creative writing www.afrofuturistaffair.com
Recurrence Plot  by Rasheedah Phillips
Image by Fabiola JL Photography
Prints ($10) + Books ($12.95) available for sale at www.afrofuturistaffair.com

Recurrence Plot  by Rasheedah Phillips

Image by Fabiola JL Photography

Prints ($10) + Books ($12.95) available for sale at www.afrofuturistaffair.com

metropolarity:

RECURRENCE PLOT: AND OTHER TIME TRAVEL TALES

the debut book from @afrofuturistaffair creative director & metropolarity founding member, Rasheedah Phillips  ++++++ ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

The interweaving stories in Recurrence Plot and Other Time Travel Tales present characters whose experiences challenge the notion that time flows in only one direction. If you want to understand what is happening at any given point in time, you cannot only look to the past for clues. You must consider the future.

A journalist races against time itself to expose the entity preying on young male teens in Philadelphia. A crystal, memory-storing bracelet transports a young mother back to the day of her own mother’s traumatic death. An unknown force of nature causes time to start flowing backwards…

Using quantum physics as an imaginative landscape, Phillips’ debut speculative collection Recurrence Plot attempts to walk the fine line between fiction and reality, fate and free will, and past, present, and future.
Available in the Metropolarity SciFi Distro

afrofuturistaffair:

This year, The AfroFuturist Affair Annual Charity & Costume Ball has expanded space-time from one evening to a month-long celebration of Afrofuturism.  In addition to the 4th Annual Costume Ball on Saturday, November 8 2014, we will have events throughout November, including workshops, dance party, readings, book club, film screenings, art exhibit, and more. We are seeking self-identified AfroFuturists to perform or display their Black sci-fi, spec-fic, and Afrofuturistic themed work at the Ball. We are also seeking submissions for workshops and presentations.
We need: Authors, Poets, Inventors, Vocalists, Rappers, Visual artists, Performance artists, Filmmakers, Dancers, Designers, Musicians, Magicians, Producers, Metaphysicians, other creatives/creators
Deadline to submit: Sunday, October 5 2014
This month we will explore the theme of Black Holographic Memory, the collective unconscious memory of Black folk through all permutations of space-time. Like a hologram, each individual contains the whole of the collective memory - we must simply learn how to access it.  We appreciate afrofuturistic and speculative works that incorporate this theme or hints at ways to access the memory hologram (however you interpret it). 
To share your ideas, talents, and proposed performances for inclusion in this year’s celebrations, please email afrofuturistaffair@gmail.com by October 5, 2014 with the below info, and “Charity Ball” in the subject line.
Name or Organization:
Contact info (email/phone):
Title of proposed performance/display/workshop:
Brief description of proposed performance/display/workshop:
If available, attach at least one image or video URL illustrating what you do. It can be a past example or a sketch of the proposed idea.
Website (if available):
If you are interested in sponsoring, vending, or volunteering, please submit an email to afrofuturistaffair@gmail.com. We are able to offer promotion and advertisement space to all sponsors. Vendors will be charged a low registration fee.
Photos of Past Charity Balls:
The AfroFuturist Affair Charity & Costume Ball
The Museum of Time
Dark Phase Space

afrofuturistaffair:

This year, The AfroFuturist Affair Annual Charity & Costume Ball has expanded space-time from one evening to a month-long celebration of Afrofuturism.  In addition to the 4th Annual Costume Ball on Saturday, November 8 2014, we will have events throughout November, including workshops, dance party, readings, book club, film screenings, art exhibit, and more. We are seeking self-identified AfroFuturists to perform or display their Black sci-fi, spec-fic, and Afrofuturistic themed work at the Ball. We are also seeking submissions for workshops and presentations.

We need: Authors, Poets, Inventors, Vocalists, Rappers, Visual artists, Performance artists, Filmmakers, Dancers, Designers, Musicians, Magicians, Producers, Metaphysicians, other creatives/creators

Deadline to submit: Sunday, October 5 2014

This month we will explore the theme of Black Holographic Memory, the collective unconscious memory of Black folk through all permutations of space-time. Like a hologram, each individual contains the whole of the collective memory - we must simply learn how to access it.  We appreciate afrofuturistic and speculative works that incorporate this theme or hints at ways to access the memory hologram (however you interpret it).

To share your ideas, talents, and proposed performances for inclusion in this year’s celebrations, please email afrofuturistaffair@gmail.com by October 5, 2014 with the below info, and “Charity Ball” in the subject line.

Name or Organization:

Contact info (email/phone):

Title of proposed performance/display/workshop:

Brief description of proposed performance/display/workshop:

If available, attach at least one image or video URL illustrating what you do. It can be a past example or a sketch of the proposed idea.

Website (if available):

If you are interested in sponsoring, vending, or volunteering, please submit an email to afrofuturistaffair@gmail.com. We are able to offer promotion and advertisement space to all sponsors. Vendors will be charged a low registration fee.

Photos of Past Charity Balls:

The AfroFuturist Affair Charity & Costume Ball

The Museum of Time

Dark Phase Space

saucerkommand:

The sci-fi art of Leo Dillon, 1933-2012

superdefstar:

cosmic music with trane and alice and pharoah/ like I can’t stop floating/

superdefstar:

So deep that Henry Dumas was shot dead by NYC forces on some mistaken identity shit. a wonderful poet and good friend of Sun Ra

Dumas was shot to death at the age of 33 by a white New York City Transit Authority police officer at 135th Street Station, in a case of “mistaken identity” on May 23, 1968.

samueldelany:

image

Near Kin explores, questions, and pays tribute the multifaceted brilliance of Octavia Butler’s work through poetry, prose and essays by writers all over the world. Among these works are:

There’s the question over a writer’s reasons for self-censorship and what it means to the future of racial…

Covert art by Fabiola JL Photography

cavetocanvas:

Carrie Mae Weems, You Became a Scientific Profile (top), An Anthropological Debate (middle), and And I Cried (bottom) from From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried,  1995–96. Collection of The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Copyright Carrie Mae Weems.

yodithnprogress:

curmudgeoning:

darkmoonperfume:

My Favorite huxtable, she get’s so slept on. I get tired of seeing pictures of tired ass Denise scrolling across my dash

Big thanks to
nickminichino
for bringing the original caption for this blessed photoset to my attention. Truer words were never spoken.

last photo: GPOY

theyalelit:

Country Ball is the attempt to recreate a home video from the late 80’s of my family’s mother’s day cookout. My process involved looking for 35 of my mothers drawings that illustrated outdoor recreational utilities, then I trace my mothers drawings by hand onto the computer, import them into a 3D program: build them to create a computer generated landscape. I perform in front of the camera and green screen 100 times; later inserting those videos into the virtual space to create a Hieronymus Bosch “Garden of Earthly Delights” inspired landscape. This gesture is an attempt to use drawing, performance and technology as a device to translate and document a personal mythology.

Jacolby Satterwhite

Critics generally don’t associate Black people with ideas. They see marginal people; they see just another story about Black folks. They regard the whole thing as sociologically interesting perhaps, but very parochial. There’s a notion out in the land that there are human beings one writes about, and then there are Black people or Indians or some other marginal group. If you write about the world from that point of view, somehow it is considered lesser. We are people, not aliens. We live, we love, and we die."
— Toni Morrison (via blackcontemporaryart)